2021 Literary Salon

Some good news after the unfortunate 2020 cancellation due to Covid-19-restrictions the Eurobodalla Literary Salon returns! Artworks, from The Basil Sellers Art Prize Retrospective exhibition (26 June to 8 August) showcasing that event’s history, are the inspiration for short stories and poems featured in this year’s Literary Salon. The Bas, exhibition space attached to the Moruya Library, will be the venue for the 2021 Literary Salon. The Salon has been part of the Eurobodalla literary scene since 2016 and members from the Eurobodalla Writers Group are excited to once again be participating in the event. Bookings for the Literary Salon on either Wednesday 4th August or Friday 6th August are essential. Ticket numbers are limited due to Covid-venue-restrictions. https://thebas.com.au/public-programs scroll down to The Eurobodalla Literary Salons

EWG Meetings 2021

Eurobodalla Writers Day Group Program 2021 3 February to December


Eurobodalla Writers day and night meetings: Members and visitors please note that meetings via Zoom may be substituted, or the venue cancelled at short notice, during Eurobodalla Covid-19 restrictions on gatherings. Covid sign-in, hand sanitiser, bring your own tea/coffee mug protocols, bring a mask if required. Do not attend if unwell. Members please advise via email if you are not attending a meeting.

Night group meetings are in private venues around the Moruya area on the first Tuesday of every month (6.30-8.30pm) – bookings for all meetings essential. Writing for works towards publication, to develop stories & memoirs, group novella, writing experience. If you’re not writing a story and wish to attend the night group please choose topics from the day group program or submit your own topic.

Day group meetings are on the first Wednesday of every month in the Red Door Hall next to Anglican Church Page St Moruya – bookings for all meetings essential. Meetings are from 10.30am to 1.30pm. See topics for day-time meetings. Note: please email of stories and poems prior as per Committee’s new guidelines (see EWG secretary’s emails for further information).

New enquiries for both groups welcome

Topics for July to December day-time meetings

Topics are open to writer’s interpretation. Short story to 1000 words, Drabble is a complete story in exactly 100 words, poetry

07 July:                 Come Away with Me OR Spring; Summer; Autumn; Winter. (4 separate tasks, using a different style or genre for each.) See doc – list of genres. Drabble: Puzzlement.

04 Aug:                View from a Train OR Falling. Drabble: Either topic.

01 Sep:                Excursion: Either Moruya Historical Museum or Eurobodalla Botanic Gardens. Fall back topics: Trees OR Sandshoes.

06 Oct:                 Write about a place you used to go to as a childOR I Was Born at the Wrong Time. Drabble: Patience.

03 Nov:               Begin a story with these words: ‘In the vine-shadows on the veranda…’ OR Moving.  Drabble: either topic

01 Dec:                Christmas party.

Topics for February to June day-time meetings

Topics are open to writer’s interpretation. A Drabble is a complete story in exactly 100 words

03 Feb:                 Position Doubtful OR Late Nights on Air. Drabble:  Laziness (for either topic)

03 Mar:                Traveller’s Tale OR Ruby Drabble: either topic

07 Apr:                 Across the Valley: Write a story or poetry with the eye of a cinematographer (background noise, weather, colour, texture, detail, angle of view, scene opening)                      

A workshop, if meeting in person

05 May:                Free topic, but you MUST:

1. Begin the story at sunrise.

2. You must use the following words somewhere in your story: SIGNATURE, PATIENT and BICYCLE.

3. Your story must include a character who has to make a CHOICE.

Drabble: either topic.

02 June:               Crossroads OR Research a famous person from NSW 1788-1838. Create a fictional side-character and build a story mixing fact and fiction. Drabble: Fear.

Dark Days

Dark Days

The dragon breathes out

Spits tongues crimson, tangerine, gold

Devours brittle bush

Black spumes spew forth

Demonic, hellish, apocalyptic

It is 2 am

 

The eye sees, the ear hears nothing

No power no phone no internet

 

Embers tossed high spat up like fire crackers

The dragon gorging morphing

Acrid smoke punctures lungs, curdling

Blackened leaves rain down

Strewn like seaweed along the sand

 

Preparation protection packing

Decision indecision

The little brown suitcase – quick!

Precious link to the past

Rattled minds raw hearts stunned

Huddling on beaches, backs to the water

Holding each other in the 2 pm dark

 

Plugged in again

Information double-edged

Too little

Some lost everything

Who?

Others spared

Stopped at the gate, took next door

Who, who?

Too much

Wildlife incinerated, forests blackened sticks

How to process so much loss

 

And yet… courage, community and hope

Exhausted fireys return to the fray

Helicopters hammer close by, scoop up water, taming the beast

Homes and pockets open

New shoots spring fluoro green, bright fuzz on scorched trees

A chicken lays its first egg

A wallaby, nursed back to health, returns each evening in thanks

A firey cradles water dragon eggs, from the rubble of a gutted home

 

© Rosie Toth March 2020

please send the fire away

At 6.30am on 31st December the Rural Fire Service sent everyone an urgent phone message: the fire is here, seek shelter or go to the beach.

I fled at once to the local evacuation centre, 2k away. By 10.15 I was sent to a motel in Batemans Bay CBD, 1k away, with a woman I knew slightly, both of us oldies with health issues. At about 12.30 lunchtime the huge glass windows in our room got really hot, the sky was a horrible brown, so we soaked bath towels in case we had to put them over our heads. Suddenly the whole world turned crimson for maybe 30 seconds, then pitch black. We felt our way into our tiny shower room and quietly and calmly said the Lord’s Prayer and the 23rd Psalm repeatedly. We remained like that for 30 or 40 minutes. For the whole time we were in that situation, I felt like we were in a quiet, calm little bubble. We came out when the sky lightened in the tiny window.

On 4th January in the middle of the day, the motel windows started getting hot again. I was alone and went on the verandah and watched the sky go brown again. Motel staff were hosing the trees. I watched a large, horrible, dark brown cloud slowly, determinedly coming towards us from the south. Oh, no, I thought, not again! It kept coming and was almost above us and I spontaneously said aloud “Oh God, please send it away, please send the cloud and fire away, I can’t bear it again, please send the fire away, dear God, please send the cloud away, please send it away!”  Immediately I said these words, the cloud stopped in its tracks, then retreated! It did not dissolve, it just went back south, slowly and determinedly, the way it had come! It did so immediately, and very clearly. Fortunately I had the room to myself and was able to thank The Divine aloud, over and over again, in between sobs of relief!

Two days later on the 6th, I was meditating on the motel verandah, the sky a light grey. After meditating, I was just staring vaguely and peacefully at the sky, and suddenly realised I was staring at a sky chock-full of dancing vibrations! The air around me was just chockers with sparkling, dancing vibrations. I sat there in bliss, watching, and quietly thanking God in adoration and gratitude.

NOTE: The sparkling vibrations in the air are called Chaitanya in the Hindu religion.

I have not exaggerated or embellished anything; everything happened exactly as I have written. I went home on the 8th. A few houses on the other side of my suburb were destroyed. My side was untouched. It was wonderful to be back with my meditation corner in my bedroom!

In those nine days alone, some 456 homes were destroyed in Eurobodalla shire, more than a dozen businesses destroyed or badly damaged, and more than 1,000 out-buildings – studios, garages, storage sheds, farm buildings – destroyed. The fires went on to do much more damage during January.

These are only some of my experiences in Batemans Bay from 31 Dec to 8 Jan

© Jennie Mairie 20 March 2020

Dark Days

(part of the bushfire stories and poems series)

Blazing lights, piercing pain

Frightened screams cry out in vain

Heart beats faster

Cold, scared – disaster

Dark days

A shadow above – exultation

Monsters in night

Fears ignite

Circling demons enter the gloom

Sobs heard from that scary room

Dark days

Room fills with light – salvation

Banished by the group

No way to recoup

Heart fills with fear

What a toxic atmosphere

Dark days

Arms that open wide – absolution

Joy to despair

No long a pair

What did I do wrong?

I no longer belong

Dark days

Nothing can help – desolation

Wheeled chair in rain

Limbs racked with pain

Life’s inhumane

Too late to complain

Dark days

Radiance above – liberation

© Lalla Barden 19 Feb 2020